Nashvillians turn out for a car-free 12th Ave S

On a warm Sunday afternoon, the citizens took over the street again, reclaiming it from the cars.  The police blocked off a 2.3-mile stretch of 12th Ave S — from 11th Ave S in the Gulch to Kirkwood Ave in 12 South — for Nashvillians to enjoy the street by foot, bicycle, skates, unicycle, pogo stick, and more on October 30.

Community organizations turned out to set up displays and games, such as this giant Jenga:

dsc_0247.jpgAnd this giant map of Nashville, showing where (and how) people had come from to get to the open street:

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In 12 South, folks ambled along the street, enjoying the sunshine:

And then there was this guy, who converted his bike into a TIE fighter:

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The parade started early in the afternoon at Halycon Bike Shop, and yes, they had pumpkin spice this-and-that:

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There was even dancing in the streets, ’cause, hey, no cars:

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Better bike lanes coming to Music Row

Walk Bike Nashville is reporting that reconfigured, safer bike lanes will be installed on 16th Ave S, 17 Ave S, and Magnolia Blvd this summer.  The changes will be installed between 21st Ave S and the Music Circle Roundabout.  16th and 17th Avenues S are colloquially known as Music Row.

For most of the route, the bike lanes will be on the left side of the streets, separated from cars by flexible bollards.  On Magnolia Blvd in the southbound direction, however, the schematic drawing appears to indicate that the bike lanes will be between the right curb and parallel parking, but still separated by bollards.

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Drawing of new traffic configuration for Music Row. Provided by Walk Bike Nashville.
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Drawing of new traffic configuration for Magnolia Blvd. Provided by Walk Bike Nashville.

The bike lanes on Music Row are some of the oldest in the city.  The current right-hand configuration, however, leaves cyclists vulnerable to opening car doors and cars pulling out onto the road from the parallel parking spots.  “We are really excited to see the city trying out innovative and cutting edge bikeway designs and are eager to see how the designs in-person,” Walk Bike Nashville wrote in its blog post.  “We are sure there will be a learning curve–both for bikes and drivers.”

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